Thursday, June 08, 2006

In the beginning...

I always wondered where God was living in Genesis 1:1. Classical physics say there was nothing before the Big Bang, and I couldn't believe God was just sitting there in nothing. Kind of boring, I would think.

But now, our own Penn State scientists tell me He probably had some kind of "pre-Bang" digs, after all...

Penn State researchers look beyond birth of universe

Sir Chuck, squinting through the dark glass...

5 comments:

  1. Just sitting there implies time.

    Omnipresence means everywhere and everywhen. If you can wrap your head around everywhen, share.

    I can imagine, in my own limited way, omnipotent - I can get stronger. Omniscient - I can get smarter. Omnipresent - I wish I could be in two places at once. But to be completely uninhibited on time, is way beyond my imagination.

    Not moving in time, but no time.....

    sir don
    Knight of the Golden Horseshoe

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  2. At that level our imagination collapses. We cannot imagine a universe with an infinite past(an infinite future is easier). At the same time we cannot imagine a beginning to the universe(what is there before). We can imagine God being before the beginning of the universe. But as we cannot realy imagine God that is a problem.
    Most of the things we are told about that sort of thing are either analytic studies or poetry.
    The information given by both is always vague to us, in different ways, as we simply can't imagine things so great. We can just be vaguely aware of their existance.

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  3. Sir Chuck,

    You raise and interesting question.

    In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

    The word Hebrew word "heaven" shamayim can mean

    1) heaven, heavens, sky
    a) visible heavens, sky
    1) as abode of the stars
    2) as the visible universe, the sky, atmosphere, etc
    b) Heaven (as the abode of God)

    according to http://www.blueletterbible.org, a great site, by the way.

    In this case, I believe it means the physical universe that we see from our very limited telescopes. God Himself, I believe, was living in His glorious heaven and doing other things, perhaps creating other worlds. I can only guess about that but we do know that God's nature does not change and that He is eternal. My conclusion, therefore, is that He has been running a very big universe that we do not see at this time. He is very creative, so it is logical that He was busy creating things.

    I think He will go on creating things after we are in heaven, so we will never get bored by the lack of new things.

    Proverbs 25:2. It is the glory of God to conceal a matter,
    But the glory of kings is to search out a matter.

    Sir John, looking forward to a lot of fun

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  4. Proverbs 25:2. It is the glory of God to conceal a matter,
    But the glory of kings is to search out a matter.


    Great scripture, Sir John.

    I like your viewpoint. God creates, we discover (to the best of understanding), He creates some more. Sort of like a parent teaching a child (fancy that!)

    So in Sir Don's everywhen (the part prior to Gen 1:1), what had God created, and where is it now? As far as I know, these astrophysicists and astronomers are only exploring our universe. Did the pre-Bang stuff cease after the Bang, or is God saving that from us? Big-H Heaven, for instance? Are these guys beginning to do the math to figure out the way to Heaven?

    It fits nicely to think of Heaven as a parallel universe, one that we can comprehend when we get there, but have no way to access without God's help. So God could have created our universe in a Big Bang, from the previous universe H that these researchers find mathematical hints of. And His promise to us is to allow us to "cross over" if we believe in His Word.

    I was just thinkin'...:-)

    Sir C the matter-searcher

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  5. For our conversation is in heaven; from whence also we look for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ:

    - Phl 3:20

    A nice verse for the Table Round...

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