Wednesday, October 04, 2006

Bill O'Reilly Blasts Pastor for Following the Bible

I saw this exchange on TV Monday night and couldn't help but laugh. "Sir" Bill told the lawyer from the Christian organization that he couldn't be using a direct quote "because the Bible doesn't sound like that." So he proclaimed the pastor's method as "bull".

Unfortunately for Bill, the lawyer had provided him with a wonderfully concise explanation of Matthew 18:15-17, and had even given the chapter and verse. Does Bill think a guy would cite chapter and verse and then feed him "bull"?

Problem with intuitive Christianity...it sometimes isn't intuitive.

Sir Chuck

3 comments:

  1. Actually I'm not sure what "rely on your Catholic heritage has to do with it". It sounds more like relying on sentiment.

    sir jason

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  2. Sir Ja-

    The blogger's reference to Catholic heritage alludes to O'Reilly's argument that in the Catholic church the confession is private and considered secret under most cases...not to be announced to the church. Thus, Catholic tradition does indeed seem to contradict Matthew 18:17...

    Easy to see why Catholics would take offense at the pastor's course of action.

    Sir C

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  3. Sir Ja-

    The blogger's reference to Catholic heritage alludes to O'Reilly's argument that in the Catholic church the confession is private and considered secret under most cases...not to be announced to the church. Thus, Catholic tradition does indeed seem to contradict Matthew 18:17...

    Easy to see why Catholics would take offense at the pastor's course of action.
    ______________________________
    Private confession("confess your faults one to another")is about weakness and stumbling and is reasonably simmilar in both traditions. The Catholic's formalizing of it is probably not a good idea-I don't think that should be done with strangers simply because one respects their clerical rank. A priest can be a gossip to, it is just worse for him to be.
    However the verse in the Bible refers to blatant rebellion which is handled in the Catholic Church in a more elaborate way but leads to the same thing(see Catholic Encyclopedia, Canon Law).
    One necessary part about discourse is not to assume more dissaggreement then there really is. The manner O'Reily disliked is closer to scripture-and less clumsy-then the Catholic method but is not completely alien. I think a number of Catholics would be more sympathetic then O'Reily.

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