Friday, December 01, 2006

The Round Table of Jesus Christ

The Round Table of Jesus Christ


Knights and brothers

This verse has always mystified me.

The lizard you may grasp with the hands, Yet it is in kings' palaces. Pro 30:28 (NASB)

About half of the translations, including KJB, call it a spider, the other half call it a lizard. Does this mean that a lizard is useful to kings in that it eats insects?

I pose this to all the faire and wise knights.

Sir John, seeking counsel

5 comments:

  1. Always in context.....

    v.24 - Four things on earth are small, yet they are extremely wise: (NIV)

    A lizard (or spider) can be caught and held, but they have the "wisdom" to enter the palace. The palace of the king would be the most secure place in the land. Probably a few spiders in the White House.

    That's the literal meaning to me.

    The lesson, that's another thing. This appears to be a parable. I'm not sure if it saying to be like the four creatures or what to watch for from the four.

    sir don.....
    Knight of the Golden Horseshoe

    ReplyDelete
  2. "...LIZARDS, SPIDERS, and "other" CREEPY-CRAWLERS....I would be very CAUTIOUS about...SERPENTS TOO...(like the DEVIL)...Beware...!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ants-work hard

    Conies-"nest in the rocks"-have foresight(like ants)

    locusts-don't have to be told to work together, know instinctively how to organize themselves so that all get their due. A very fine quality. I remember once reading about how a Macdonalds in Asia had to teach people to stand in line. Standing in line is a little custom we take for granted but is a very wise one. It conceeds to others their chance and in turn trusts that the waiter will give each his food when it comes. Soloman would approve.

    I don't know about lizards/spiders. Why are they found in King's palaces? Because they are small and harmless. Because no one is going to take a great effort to make sure they are not in the Kings palace(imagine the fuss if there was a large animal there). They are allowed to stay because they are meek and humble and don't make to much of themselves.
    Could that be?

    Sir Jason

    ReplyDelete
  4. I wish I hadn't been the one to notice this, but it has occurred to me before, so it is not a comment on how rough my wife has been on me this week...

    First of all, the Hebrew lexicon confirms the thing as a spider, and that the lizard word is from erroneous manuscripts. So I go with the KJV on this...

    The spider taketh hold with her hands, and is in kings' palaces.

    I note that the spider is feminine...and then I note that the previous two quartets all refer to a woman in the fourth of the quarters (v.19 and 23). So,to follow the train of thought of the writer, I identify the spider as a woman weaving her web in the palace of the king.

    She is one of the "exceedingly wise things", and she "taketh hold with her hands". Would any of ye faire knights try to argue against the cunning wisdom exhibited by many of the queens of history? Or that they were quite able to orchestrate a stronghold on the happenings of the castle. (Imagine a conductor waving his hands in orchestration).

    Also note the interluding negative feminine reference in verse 20...can you doubt the writer has feminine treachery or manipulation on his mind?

    And then, as a salve to ease his conscience and lift his spirits, he writes chapter 31...the tribute to the "perfect" woman.

    My comfort in the Proverbs is that I married one of those Proverbs 31 women (after the Lord swept the spiders away), and that I don't have to live in the "wisdom" of Proverbs 30.

    Sir Chuck, wary of The Spider

    ReplyDelete
  5. said...

    I wish I hadn't been the one to notice this, but it has occurred to me before, so it is not a comment on how rough my wife has been on me this week...

    First of all, the Hebrew lexicon confirms the thing as a spider, and that the lizard word is from erroneous manuscripts. So I go with the KJV on this...

    The spider taketh hold with her hands, and is in kings' palaces.

    I note that the spider is feminine...and then I note that the previous two quartets all refer to a woman in the fourth of the quarters (v.19 and 23). So,to follow the train of thought of the writer, I identify the spider as a woman weaving her web in the palace of the king.

    She is one of the "exceedingly wise things", and she "taketh hold with her hands". Would any of ye faire knights try to argue against the cunning wisdom exhibited by many of the queens of history? Or that they were quite able to orchestrate a stronghold on the happenings of the castle. (Imagine a conductor waving his hands in orchestration).

    Also note the interluding negative feminine reference in verse 20...can you doubt the writer has feminine treachery or manipulation on his mind?

    And then, as a salve to ease his conscience and lift his spirits, he writes chapter 31...the tribute to the "perfect" woman.

    My comfort in the Proverbs is that I married one of those Proverbs 31 women (after the Lord swept the spiders away), and that I don't have to live in the "wisdom" of Proverbs 30.

    Sir Chuck, wary of The Spider

    1:50 PM
    _____________________________
    It's possible enough. Soloman was likly caught in the paradoxical but not uncommon(especially in the unnatural and grotesque system of mass polygamy)dilema of having any woman he wanted but being unlucky in love.
    Historically dysfunction on a quite spectacular level has been so common as to be almost universal. "Normal" royal families were so rare that one can make note of them simply for being normal.
    Middling people seem to be the most fortunate in this and other matters. Which is another point for "give me neither poverty nor riches.

    ReplyDelete